Category Archives: solstice

Twelfth Night

Twelfth Night, the eve of January 5, is in English folk custom the end of Christmas merrymaking and in ancient Celtic tradition the end of the 12-day winter solstice celebration.

On this night, it was customary for the assembled company to toast one another from the wassail bowl. In Old English, wassail means “Be in good health,” but the term also was applied to the drink itself (usually spiced ale) 😉

Wassail Recipe here.

(Today’s Candle fragrance: Spiced Cranapples & Ginger: Tart cranberries and sweet, juicy apples infused with warm ginger and a hint of spicy cinnamon.)

Artist info: http://handful-of-pebbles.deviantart.com/


Full M☼☼n Lunar Eclipse on the Midwinter Solstice.

Early Tuesday morning stargazers all over North America and  Europe will storms willing be able to witness a spectacular sight!  A total lunar eclipse that will also coincide with the Winter Solstice.  The Sun, Earth and Moon will be in a direct line -the moon should still be visible,
but will possibly turn pink or even red.  Most of this refracted light is in the red part of the spectrum and as a result the moon, seen from Earth, turns a reddish, coppery or orange hue, sometimes even brownish.

“The entire event is visible from North America, Greenland and Iceland,” says NASA’s veteran eclipse expert Fred Espenak, pointing out that for observers in the western United States and Canada, the show will start on Monday evening rather than Tuesday morning.

“Western Europe will see the beginning stages of the eclipse before moonset, while western Asia will get the later stages after moonrise.”

The eclipse runs for three and a half hours, from 6:33 GMT to 10:01 GMT (1:33 a.m. EST to 5:01 a.m. EST), although the stage of total eclipse — when the moon heads into the “umbra” cast by the Earth — lasts from 7:41 to 8:53 GMT (2:41 a.m. EST to 3:53 a.m. EST).

Lunar eclipses have long been associated with superstitions and signs of ill omen, especially in battle.  The defeat of the Persian king Darius III by Alexander the Great in the Battle of Gaugamela in 331 B.C. was foretold when the moon turned blood-red a few days earlier.

The last total lunar eclipse took place on Feb. 21, 2008. Next year, says Espenak, will see two: on June 15 and Dec. 10. This Solstice Eclipse is the first in 456 years!

What will you do to celebrate?  I am using up some wishes hoping the clouds and rain clear-our area in Southern California is currently hit by what meteorologists are calling the storm of the century. I am going to settle in with a tall glass of wine, light a few candles and hope for the best!  🙂

Our Candle fragrance of the day is of course our Winter Solstice: an exquisite blend of Woods, Frozen Blackberry, Fig, Rose, Amber and Spices. Opening with Bergamot and Fig, it reveals a luscious heart of French Rose, Cinnamon, Frozen Blackberry. Base notes of most seductive Cedar, Balsam and Sandalwood are sweetened with Amber.

Winter Solstice Candle

Love, Laughter & Candlelight!